Woden, Buddha and the Neoplatonist concept of “the One”

The neoplatonic notion of “the One”…

The “Supreme Truth” of which all categories of thought are mere emanations, but which is itself beyond all categories. And which the achievement of union with is regarded as the highest good.

Fundamentally speaking, a “greater than all” was not all that new of an idea by the time neoplatonism emerged in the 3rd century AD. Shades of it existed in recorded Indo-European thought as far back as the RigVeda, from which it was eventually fully developed in Vaishavism (c.6th century BC) and Buddhism (6th to 4th century BC). We see a similar evolution in Persian belief with the rise of the Achaemenid Empire (550 BC) and the emergence of Zoroastrianism (5th century BC), while such rare and oddball early Greek philosophers as Xenophanes  were offending the sensibilities of their fellow Greeks as early as the late 6th century BC with such notions; so fundamentally monotheistic in their thinking that the early (Greek) Christians were utilizing Xenophanes’ arguments against polytheism to promote their own Judaeo-Hellenic form of monotheism as early as the late 2nd century AD, ie. Clement of Alexandria.

The same can be said of neoplatoism and the various Abrahamic religions; Islam included.

To what degree Jewish monotheism — which evolved out of it’s own polytheism to monolatry (ie. acknowledgement of many gods, exclusive worship of one) in c.7th century BC — influenced or was influenced these thoughts is… a consideration worth following to wherever it might lead. For anyone who is so inclined.

Not that the acknowledgement of a “One” per say is at all alien to native Indo-European belief or the human experience in general. If nothing else, the “seed” of the idea is there, existing in an implicit, potential state. Most of our Creation myths are founded on the fundamental notion of (ahem) “oneness” or “singularity” from which all of existence and Creation emanate. Some of the early Greek philosophers referred to this “formless unity” as Chaos — though it’s place in the cosmology is not constant — while the Buddhists called it Nirvana; though for the Buddhist it is less “a place” or “a point in time”, or even “a frame of mind”, than it is the absence of such things, ie. “to blow out”, but the achievement of which nevertheless (ahem) “liberates” one from the endless cycles of reincarnation in existence and Creation.

In Germanic belief we have Ginnungagap as the primal foundation for all existence and Creation. But it is not perceived as a “One”, or even a “Zero”, but rather an “Infinite“. The meaning of ginnunga-, while debatable, and perhaps ultimately multifaceted, is reflected in the Eddic word Gylfaginning meaning the (ahem) “deluding” of Gylfi; though perhaps better, if more clumsily rendered as “a tricking of the senses” and associated with a surreal or dreamlike state of mind, as also found in the High One’s meetings with Olaf Trygvason of Norway, Edwin of Northumbria, etc.

Ginnungagap is thus where the senses, and so sensibility, fail; beyond or separate from all categories of thought, existing just beyond the “event horizon” of human conception. As such it parallels the meaning of the word rune (mystery) and reflects the fundamental meaning — and ultimately the hallowing nature! — of the word wih (separate).

And so we read of Woden’s ordeal in the Havamal where “none dealt me bread nor drink from the horn”, which indicates a rejection by (and/or of) society to Germanic thinking; Of how he hung on that “wind-swept tree of which no one knows from what root it rises”, which is the “World Tree” or “Truth of Germanic culture”, the origins of which are lost in mystery; And of how Woden peered “down to the depths” to ultimately “take up the runes with a roaring scream”, and then “fell back from there”, ie. from the Tree and into Creation.

By my interpretation, the Wodenic revelation here, born out of a collapse of the 1,000+ year long clock-work order of the Nordic Bronze Age, was a realization of the (ahem) “oneness” that rests at the foundation of the manifest All. He looked into what had hitherto been casually regarded and swept aside as “nothing”. Effectively, he achieved had “Nirvana” and union with “the One”.

The Allfather did not however then proceed to author and advocate any sort of (lasting) union with “the One”. After all, like all of the others — Buddha clearly included since we are able to talk about Buddhism at all — the Tree, ultimately rooted as it is in Ginnungagap, simply sucked Woden up and spat him back out into existence and Creation.

And so, more honestly in my opinion, we see Woden go on to embrace Creation, sacrificing an eye to Mimir (Memory) for a draught from his well-spring of experience; which is itself identical to the knowledge symbolized in the World Tree. And only then does he state, “Then I began to grow and wax well in wisdom. From a word to a word I was led to a word. From a deed to another deed.”

This is a typical Western response, ie. activist, world accepting, to the same fundamental realization that Eastern Quietism and it’s world rejection were born from.

The so-called “One”, the ineffable mystery, is not an end unto itself; as the aforementioned Indo-Iranians, Jews, Greeks, and Christians might have had it. It is the original means to an end, the hallowing force (wih) as opposed to the hallowed object (halig), the mystery that truth and law, as an organic and evolving thing, is rooted in and ultimately sustained by … keeping Truth fresh, relevant and up-to-date (integral, ie. trothful) with the challenges of existence and the influx of experience. It is respect of the Mystery that prevents the pretentious snobbery of locked in, cut-in-stone systems; as most evident in those philosophies that imagine they possess the Mystery, and particularly when accompanied by the belief that they must carry it to others.

Hence why the Old Norse called it simply Ginnungagap; the gap of magical play upon the senses, of bewilderment, of delusion. A nice place to visit, but one which, of those who have, none ever seem to settle.

And so, pray tell, if Buddha was unmoved by Maya (Delusion, desire), why did he touch the earth? Only to then, conveniently enough, imagine that he not only defeated Maya, and thereby achieved Nirvana, which in fact was his desire, but then went on to imagine he could teach the path to it?

As Garman Lord once remarked of Eastern Quietisms, they might well be “the ultimate ego trip in disguise”.

1 thought on “Woden, Buddha and the Neoplatonist concept of “the One”

  1. K

    https://isthatinthebible.wordpress.com/2018/07/10/bethel-the-forgotten-god-of-israel/
    http://www.kchanson.com/ANCDOCS/westsem/passover.html

    Jewish monotheism was likely much later than is widely assumed. Even the Old Testament is full of clues and giveaways. Count from Noah to Abraham. You will find that Noah and Shem(among others) would have been alive in the time of Abraham. And yet Yahweh comes to Abraham as if Abraham and his people in “Ur of the Chaldees(an anachronism in itself)” had no knowledge of this deity. Joshua 24 even says that Abraham, Terah, Lot, and their ancestors over in Mesopotamia served other gods before Yahweh came along. They would have you believe that the old man and his sons who saved all animal and human life, who were everyone’s ancestors, were still around and yet everyone forgot the god that (supposedly) flooded the world, mixed up all the languages, received sacrifices from Noah, made a compact with him, and made the rainbow? I think it gives away the lateness of the flood story’s addition and its Mesopotamian origin. Yahweh originally had nothing to do with the flood. The writers of the Old Testament tried different ways to cover up the fact that Yahweh was not always Israel’s god(or their main one). Yahweh is also very personal, full of anger and with a humanoid form(in the J source in particular). Xenophanes’ idea of an original god is a sphere with its center everywhere, a great cosmic mind without any human form or passions. It looks to me like there was Greek, Persian, and possibly Phoenician influence on the Jews(Hellenistic Judaism) rather than the other way around. Thales(the proto-philosopher) and Zeno(the first Stoic) were Phoenicians. The Persian moral dualism and names of demons like Aeshma Daeva also started cropping up in Jewish writing.

    This concept of a mysterious beginning point that nothing much can be said of has many iterations and names in different cultures. Sometimes it is depicted as being more “personal” or monstrous and sometimes less. Often it is primordial waters, such as the Egyptian Nu. I think that is a good image of the beginning. Darkness and “waters” that are ever shifting and without form. Others might call it chaos, or monad, or ein sof, or ginnungagap, tehomot(as in the book of Genesis), or Abzu/Tiamat, or the void, or sunyata, or the unmanifest.

    There is a book called “Philosophy as a Rite of Rebirth: From Ancient Egypt to Neoplatonism” by Algis Uzdavinys that casts Neoplatonism as a continuation of Egyptian thought. The Egyptians expressed metaphysical ideas in myths, while the Greeks and others of the later Hellenistic tradition expressed similar things in terms of abstractions.

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